Science as Sacred Metaphor: An Evolving Revelation

Couverture
Liturgical Press, 2006 - 138 pages

For Sister Elizabeth Michal Boyle, there's nothing quite like the world of science 'with its aha! moments, quandaries, and inscrutable mysteries 'to usher the modern seeker into the divine presence of God. In this book, she creates a sacred space at the intersection where science and faith meet.

Sister Boyle says that Jesus, who used the lives of birds and wildflowers as signs of the divine would probably be saying today, Consider the implications of lilies and stars, of quarks and quantas. Learn from the drama of life-out-of-death in everything from seeds to tsunamis.

In Science as Sacred Metaphor, Sister Boyle leads the reader to unravel the fascinating threads of science and follow them to the marvelous skein of spiritual insight and contemplative wonder. With a blend of scientific fact, powerful poetry, and spiritual exploration, she helps the reader discover a new and more deeply than ever-gracious Mystery in whom all that exists lives and moves and has its being.

Elizabeth Michal Boyle, OP, PhD, is a professor of English at Caldwell College, Caldwell, New Jersey. Her book, Preaching the Poetry of the Gospels, won a first place award from the Catholic Press Association in 2004. A playwright, poet, and teacher, she finds inspiration for poetry and prayer in the natural sciences.

À l'intérieur du livre

Table des matières

Chapter
15
Chapter Three
28
Chapter Four
47
Chapter Five
62
Chapter
80
A Timeless Experience
108
Afterword
115
Works Cited
123
Acknowledgments
135
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 6 - As kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies draw flame; As tumbled over rim in roundy wells Stones ring; like each tucked string tells, each hung bell's Bow swung finds tongue to fling out broad its name; Each mortal thing does one thing and the same: Deals out that being indoors each one dwells; Selves — goes itself; myself it speaks and spells, Crying What I do is me: for that I came.
Page 62 - The heavens are telling the glory of God; and the firmament proclaims His handiwork. Day to day pours forth speech, and night to night declares knowledge. There is no speech, nor are there words; their voice is not heard; Yet their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world.
Page 9 - O world invisible, we view thee, O world intangible, we touch thee, O world unknowable, we know thee, Inapprehensible, we clutch thee ! Does the fish soar to find the ocean, The eagle plunge to find the air — That we ask of the stars in motion If they have rumour of thee there? Not where the wheeling systems darken, And our benumbed conceiving soars! — The drift of pinions, would we hearken, Beats at our own clay-shuttered doors. The angels keep their ancient places ; — Turn but a stone, and...
Page 20 - Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.
Page 18 - Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they neither toil nor spin; yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not clothed like one of these.
Page 9 - Turn but a stone, and start a wing ! *Tis ye, 'tis your estranged faces, That miss the many-splendoured thing. But (when so sad thou canst not sadder) Cry ; — and upon thy so sore loss Shall shine the traffic of Jacob's ladder Pitched betwixt Heaven and Charing Cross. Yea, in the night, my Soul, my daughter, Cry, — clinging Heaven by the hems ; And lo, Christ walking on the water, Not of Gennesareth, but Thames...
Page 106 - But, in the eternities, Doubtless we shall compare together, hear A million alien Gospels, in what guise He trod the Pleiades, the Lyre, the Bear. O be prepared, my soul! To read the inconceivable, to scan The million forms of God those stars unroll When, in our turn, we show to them a Man.

À propos de l'auteur (2006)

Elizabeth Michael Boyle, OP, PhD, is a professor of English at Caldwell College, Caldwell, New Jersey. Her book, Preaching the Poetry of the Gospels, won a first place award from the Catholic Press Association in 2004. A playwright, poet, and teacher, she finds inspiration for poetry and prayer in the natural sciences.

Informations bibliographiques