Buddhism for Mothers: A Calm Approach to Caring for Yourself and Your Children

Couverture
Allen & Unwin, 2003 - 224 pages
3 Avis
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Addressing the often-overlooked spiritual needs of mothers, this book discusses Buddhist teachings as applied to the everyday challenges and stresses of raising children. Offered are ways for mothers to reconnect with their inner selves and become calmer and happier—with the recognition that a happier mother will be a better parent. This realistic look at motherhood acknowledges the sorrows as well as the joys of mothering and offers real and achievable coping strategies for mothers to renew their lives on a deep level.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - Liciasings - LibraryThing

I found this an interesting, useful, and uplifting book. Though I am not a Buddhist and have no intention of ever calling myself one, I found it interesting to read about practices, words and ways of ... Consulter l'avis complet

Excellent book!

Avis d'utilisateur  - alurien - Overstock.com

I absolutely love this book. The author is realistic about parenting she doesnt present it as 100% laughing babies and butterflies. She gives real world advice about dealing with stress focusing and ... Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

I
iii
II
v
III
vii
IV
xiii
V
15
VI
39
VII
57
VIII
77
XVII
163
XVIII
183
XIX
200
XX
204
XXI
208
XXII
210
XXIII
213
XXIV
217

X
97
XII
121
XIV
143

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 116 - A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.
Page 116 - Universe', a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest- a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.
Page 84 - We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts we make the world.
Page 32 - The thought manifests as the word; The word manifests as the deed; The deed develops into habit; And habit hardens into character; So watch the thought and its ways with care, and let it spring from love, born out of concern for all beings.
Page 191 - The restless, busy nature of the world, this, I declare, is at the root of pain. Attain that composure of mind which is resting in the peace of immortality. Self is but a heap of composite qualities, and its world is empty like a fantasy.
Page 58 - I would feel his wants at such a moment as fraudulent, as an attempt moreover to defraud me of living even for fifteen minutes as myself. My anger would rise; I would feel the futility of any attempt to salvage myself, and also the inequality between us: my needs always balanced against those of a child, and always losing. I could love so much better, I told myself, after even a quarter-hour of selfishness, of peace, of detachment from my children. A few minutes! But it was as if an invisible thread...
Page 210 - Do not deceive, do not despise Each other, anywhere. Do not be angry, nor should ye Secret resentment bear; For as a mother risks her life And watches o'er her child, So boundless be your love to all, So tender, kind and mild.
Page 192 - But to satisfy the necessities of life is not evil. To keep the body in good health is a duty, for otherwise we shall not be able to trim the lamp of wisdom, and keep our mind strong and clear. Water surrounds the lotus-flower, but does not wet its petals. "This is the middle path, O bhikkhus, that keeps aloof from both extremes.
Page 52 - Do not pursue the past. Do not lose yourself in the future. The past no longer is. The future has not yet come. Looking deeply at life as it is in the very here and now, the practitioner dwells in stability and freedom. We must be diligent today.
Page 104 - No one of you is a believer until he desires for his brother that which he desires for himself.

À propos de l'auteur (2003)

Sarah Napthali is a mother of two young boys who tries to apply Buddhist teachings in her daily life. Her working life has ranged from teaching English as a Second Language and corporate training, to human rights activism and interpreting. Since becoming a mother she has focussed on writing, initially for companies and later for individuals wanting to record their memoirs. With seven memoirs completed, she is the author of

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