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Madagascar, Queen of, 530.
Mahone, William, 533.
Mallory, George S., 418.
March, Francis A., 664.
Markoff, Dr., 270.
Marti, José, 8.
Meggy, Percy R., 447.
Middleton, R. W. E., 140.
Miles, Gen. Nelson A., 529.
Miller, Warner, 389.
Milsaps, Staff Captain, 532.
Moore, Henry, 152.
Moore, Willis L., 147.
Morgan, J. Pierpont, 33.
Morse, S. F. B., 9.

Murray, Andrew, 263.

Neeley, Henry Adams, 568.

Nicoll, Robertson, 426.

Noble, W. Clark, 271.

Olney, Richard, 4.

Page, Walter H., 231.

Palma, Tomas Estrada, 142.

Parkes, Henry, 42.

Pasteur, Louis, 514, 540, 541, 544, 545.

Peary, Robert E., 530.

Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart, 744.
Phillips, Philip, 152.

Pixley, Frank M., 277.

Platt, Thomas C., 388.

Po-ka-gon, Simon, 694.

Portugal, Carlos I of, 655.

Quay, Matthew S., 388.

Ralph, Julian, 745.

Reed, Thomas B., 643.
Reid, G. H., 45, 270.
Rhodes, Cecil, 386.

Ridley, Matthew White, 187.
Riis, Jacob A. 144.

Ritchie, Mr., 188.
Roberts, Marshall O., 9.
Robertson, J., 448.
Roche, James Jeffrey, 420.
Roosevelt, Theodore,
Root, George F., 272.
Rose, Charles D., 575.

Rosebery, Lord, 191.

159, 161, 163.

Salisbury, Marquis of, 130, 179.

Sangster, Margaret, 425.

Schlatter, Francis, 659.

Schofield, John M., 405.

Scudder, Henry Martyn, 30.

Seddon, R. J., 443,

Selborne, Earl of, 16.

Semmes, Raphael, 756.

Sherman, John, 678, 679, 680, 681, 685, 687.

Sinowine, Ben., 273.

Sirdar Nasrullah Khan, 18.

Smalley, George W.,

Smith, G. W., 660.

133.

Smith, Samuel Francis, 642.

Sorin, Father, 20.

Speer, Emory, 395.

Spencer Herbert, 698.

Stambuloff, Stepan, 149.

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, 651.

Sternberg, George M., 581.

Stetson, F. L., 38.

Stewart, John A., 35.

Storey, J. H., 448.

Story, W. W., 527.

Talbot, E. S., 531.

Tamehana, Tena, 443.

Tauchnitz, Baron, 407.
Taylor, Moses, 9.
Teece, R., 448.
Tesla, Nikola, 293.
Te Ugakau, Tutui, 443.
Townsend, Edward W., 743.
Trautman, Leander, 658.
Trumbull, Henry Clay, 419.
Turkey, Sultan of, 518.
Turpie, David, 6.

Volk, Leonard W., 408.

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RACE Problem in the South, 396, 457, 585.
Railways:

The Electric Railway in Massachusetts, 100.

Substitution of Electricity for Steam on Railways, 209. Record of Current Events, 26, 149, 273, 405, 529, 662.

Recreation, The Physiology of, 224.

Reed, Thomas B., as Speaker, 643; portrait, 643.
Referendum and Labor Legislation, 591.

Reid, G. H., and His colleagues, 45; portrait, 45.
Renan and His Sister, 601.

Religion, Democracy and, 229.

Religious Conference at Northfield, 263.

Religious Congress, The Coming, 592.

Religious Journalism and Journalists, 413.

Representation, Proportional, 590.

Reviews and Magazínes, Contents of, 117, 247, 375, 504, 631,

758

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SANS GENE, Marshal and Madame, 87.

Sanitary Reform, Ideals of, 205.

Scottish Review reviewed, 364.

Scribner's Magazine reviewed, 102, 232, 355, 486, 611, 732. Schlatter, the Alleged Healer, 659 portrait, 659.

School Question, The Manitoba, 452.

Secretaries of State Since 1789, 4.

Seeley, Sir J. R., 348.

Semitism, Anti, in Vienna and Paris, 14.

Settlements, Some London, 468.

Sheep Where Did the Sheep Get Its Wool? 227.

Sherman, John:

John Sherman's Story of His Own Career, 678.
Portraits, 678, 679, 650, 681, 685, 687.

Shipbuilding: Expansion of Shipbuilding Industry, 399.
Slavery Under the British Flag, 656.

Slum, Fall of a Typical New York, 172.

Slum Boys on a Farm School, 723.

Socialism of William Morris, 718.
Sociality of the Religion of Jesus, 718.

Social Economist reviewed, 360.

Social Reform, Sir John Gorst's Programme of, 204.
South Carolina and the Colored Vote, 396.
Spencer, Herbert:

Why Herbert Spencer Is an Agnostic, 88.
Character Sketch, 699; portrait, 698.

Sports:

The Season of Amateur Sports, 11.
The Rowing and Sailing Contests, 145.
The Defense of the America's Cup, 336.
In the Field of International Sport, 575.
Stambuloff, Stepan:

Stambuloff Assassinated, 148.

Sketch of Stambuloff, 482; portrait, 149.

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, at Eighty, 651; portraits, 651.

Stevenson, Robert Louis :

Stevenson and Edmund Gosse, 90.

Stevenson's Fables, 351.

Stevenson's Vailima Letters, 602.

Story, W. W., Death of, 527; portrait, 527.
Sunday Observance :

Sunday Question in the New York Convention, 389.
Closing New York Saloons on Sunday, 464.
Sunday Laws in New York, 648.

Sunday Question, 143, 259, 389, 464, 648, 712.
Surgery, Hospital, 223.

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WALL Street and the Credit of the Government, 31.
War with New Weapons, 69.

War, Palestine, the Solution of, 330.
War Feeling in Europe, 400, 403, 404.

Waterways: From the Great Lakes to the Sea, 305.
Weapons, Improved Military, 69.

Weather Bureau: Change of Administration, 146.
Weather Forecasts, Value of, 302.

West, The, in American History, 214.
Westminster Review reviewed, 491, 619

Wind as a Motive Power in the United States, 299.
Wolseley, Lord:

The New British Commander-in-Chief, 399. Commander-in-Chief Wolseley, 597; portrait, 400. Women :

Bismarck on Women in Politics, 15.

The Psychology of Woman, 82.

The Education of Women, 83.

Advice to the "New Woman," 84.

The Women of Burma, 85.

The Queen of Holland at Home, 86.

More About Jeanne d'Arc, 86.

Sarah Bernhardt, 87.

World's Women's Christian Temperance Convention, 148.

In Praise of Russian Women, 599.

Woman's Growing Influence in Public Affairs, 649.

Woman Suffrage in Utah, Massachusetts and Scuth Carolina, 649.

A Local Jeanne d'Arc in Maryland, 650.

Federation of Women's Clubs. 720.

Tendencies in the Education of Women, 721.

YACHTING: The International Yacht Race, 145, 336, 98.

ZANGWILL, Israel, Sketch of, 604; portrait, 604.

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With portraits of Mr. Gresham, Secretary Olney, Attorney-General Judson Harmon, David Turpie, A. J Warner, Asa Bushnell, José Marti, the Projectors of the Atlantic Cable, the Cornell Crew, Dr. W. G. Grace, Sir Walter Besant, Count Kalnoky, the Maid of Orleans, the late Earl of Selborne, the Earl of Selborne, Nasrullah Khan, Provost Charles C. Harrison, Father Sorin, Mrs. Henry Ward Beecher, Justice Stephen J. Field, Gen. Longstreet, Fitzhugh Lee, Rev. Dr. Bolton, and Gen. Wade Hampton, and map of the Baltic Canal, and views of the Universities North Carolina and Notre Dame.

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Current History in Caricature.....

With reproductions from American and foreign cartoon

papers.

Record of Current Events......

Howells and the Ante-Bellum Bohemians..
Von Moltke...

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With portraits of Paul Bourget and the late Rev. Dr.
Henry Martyn Scudder, and views of the proposed
Low Memorial Library at Columbia College, the new
ocean liner St. Louis, and the new Salvation Army
Building at New York.

Wall Street and the Credit of the Govern

ment....

With view of Wall street and portraits.

By Albert C. Stevens.

TERMS:-$2.50 a year in advance; 25 cents a number. Foreign postage $1 00 a year additional. Subscribers may remit to us by post office or express money orders, or by bank checks, drafts or registered letters. Money in letters is at senders' risk. Renew as early as possible in order to avoid a break in the receipt of the numbers. Bookdealers, Postmasters and Newsdealers receive subscriptions. (Subscriptions to the English REVIEW OF REVIEWS, which is edited and published by Mr. W. T. Stead in London, may be sent to this office, and orders for single copies can also be filled, at the price of $2.50 for the yearly subscription, including postage, or 25 cents for single copies.) THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS, 13 Astor Place, New York City.

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THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS.

VOL. XII.

NEW YORK, JULY, 1895.

No. 1

The Late

THE PROGRESS OF THE WORLD.

The lamented death of Walter Q. Secretary of Gresham, Secretary of State, has been State. the most prominent event of the past month, so far as American public affairs are concerned. Mr. Gresham had for more than thirty years been a man of influence and distinction, having served brilliantly through the civil war, from which he came out a brigadier general. Returning to his Indiana home, he rose rapidly as a lawyer and a Republican politician. Most of the time during the last twenty years of his life he sat upon the Federal bench, first as a district judge and afterward as a circuit judge. In 1883 he left the bench and became Postmaster-General in President Arthur's cabinet, and for a short time in 1884, after the death of Mr. Folger, he held the portfolio of the Secretary of the Treasury. Judge Gresham's friends had long regarded him as peculiarly available for the Republican presidential nomination, and in 1884 his name was much discussed, while in 1888 very powerful organized efforts were made to secure the nomination for him. His candidacy in 1892 was less conspicuous, but not less real. Nothing perhaps could better illustrate the fact that party allegiance has come to be a matter of tradition, association and convenience rather than one of vital principles, than Judge Gresham's position in 1892. The Republican nomination would have filled the cup of his life-long ambition; but it did not come to him, and he was asked to accept a nomination from the Populists, whose convention was held at Omaha. His hesitancy before declining to become the Populistic standard bearer,— a circumstance which kept the Populists anxiously waiting for some time,—showed how lightly the party tie held a man who had all his life been considered one of the foremost of Republican leaders. Later on in that same campaign it was announced that Judge Gresham had concluded to vote for the Democratic candidates, and Mr. Cleveland gave the country a surprise by selecting the “man without a party as his Secretary of State. Unquestionably Mr. Cleveland's choice of Judge Gresham was the result of his personal conviction that no man in the Democratic party could so well fill the position. But it took courage to make an appointment that was so sure to be unpopular. The Democrats who had placed Mr. Cleveland in office could not be expected to relish the

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selection of a life-long Republican as the chief of a Democratic cabinet,-not only because this was contrary to all precedent, but also because it seemed to reflect upon the quality of Democratic statesmanship. On the other hand the Republicans could not find pleasure in the spectacle of high honors heaped upon one who had been a candidate before their own convention, and had then gone over to the enemy because forsooth he would not fight in the ranks.

Mr. Gresham's Difficult Position.

These circumstances placed Mr. Gresham in a very difficult position. It is true that he enjoyed the unbounded confidence of the President, to whom he was primarily responsible. But the particular cabinet officer who is charged with the control of the country's foreign policy and relations ought to be strong in the confidence of the party in power, and personally unobjectionable to the opposition party. Mr. Gresham had sacrificed Republican confidence and good will by renouncing the party in the midst of a critical campaign, and as a stranger in the Democratic camp he was viewed with distrust by the party in power. His career as Secretary of State began with the unfortunate blunders of the administration's Hawaiian policy; and for more than two years the American people, regardless of party, have evinced a certain uneasiness and anxiety touching the wisdom of the administration's treatment of foreign questions. It is, however, quite too early to pass any final judgment upon the conduct of the state department under Mr. Gresham's headship. His high patriotism and great ability are not open to discussion. Our secretaries of state have been men of very unequal endowments of tact, judgment and knowledge, but happily they have all of them been men true as steel in their devotion to what they deemed the best interests of their country. In his private life and personal associations, the late Judge Gresham was a man of rare gifts and graces, typifying American manhood of the best sort. However much one may be disposed to criticise Mr. Gresham's public policies, it is easy to bestow sincere praise upon his vigor, his fidelity, and his many noble qualities as a man and a citizen. From the point of view of his success in public life it would seein not unjust to express the opinion that he would have been wiser if he had not oscillated

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