Benedictine Daily Prayer: A Short Breviary

Couverture
Maxwell E. Johnson
Liturgical Press, 2005 - 2266 pages

For those who want to grow spiritually, Benedictine Daily Prayer provides an everyday edition of the Divine Office. People who desire to pray with the church can do so in a simple manner by following this Benedictine daily prayer model. Based on solid and traditional prayer patterns of more than fifteen hundred years of liturgical prayer within the Benedictine monastic tradition, Benedictine Daily Prayer helps readers celebrate and appreciate God's presence that is found everywhere, especially within the Divine Office. It offers a richer diet of classic office hymnody, psalmody, and Scripture than shorter resources are able to provide.

Benedictine Daily Prayer is designed for Benedictine Oblates, Benedictine monastics, and men and women everywhere. It's small enough to fit in a briefcase for travel. Scripture readings are from the NRSV.

Click here for an easy reference guide on how to use Benedictine Daily Prayer.

Benedictine Daily Prayer includes "Introduction," "An Aid to Praying Benedictine Daily Prayer," "Monastic Calendar," "Sunday and Weekday Readings," "The Ordinary of the Liturgy of the Hours," "The Weekly Psalter," "Supplemental Psalms and Canticles for Vigils and Lauds," "Festival Psalter," "Common for Feasts of the Blessed Virgin Mary," "Common for Feasts of Apostles," "Common for Feasts of Martyrs," "Common for Feasts of Holy Men and Women," "Office for the Dead," "Proper of the Season (Advent, Christmas, Lent, Triduum, Easter, Pentecost)," "Proper of the Saints," and "Appendix: A Selection of Benedictine Prayers."

Maxwell E. Johnson, PhD, is an oblate of Saint John's Abbey, Collegeville, Minnesota, and an ordained pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. He is professor of liturgy at the University of Notre Dame. His articles have appeared frequently in Worship. He is the author of Living Water, Sealing Spirit, The Rites of Christian Initiation, and Between Memory and Hope, published by Liturgical Press.

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À l'intérieur du livre

Table des matières

Introduction
v
An Aid to Praying Benedictine Daily Prayer
xvii
Sunday and Weekday Readings
1
The Ordinary of the Liturgy of the Hours
903
The Weekly Psalter
935
Supplemental Psalms and Canticles for Vigils and Lauds
1142
Festival Psalter
1192
Common for Feasts of the Blessed Virgin Mary
1213
Common for Feasts of Martyrs
1250
Common for Feasts of Holy Men and Women
1272
Office for the Dead
1299
Proper of Seasons
1336
Proper of the Saints
1676
A Selection of Benedictine Prayers
2243
Index
2254
Droits d'auteur

Common for Feasts of Apostles
1236

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 368 - For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ. For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body— Jews or Greeks, slaves or free— and all were made to drink of one Spirit.
Page 936 - O the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are his judgments and how inscrutable his ways! "For who has known the mind of the Lord, or who has been his counselor?
Page 110 - Moreover he said, I am the God of thy father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.
Page 381 - I also received, that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve.
Page 360 - The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a sharing in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a sharing in the body of Christ? Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.
Page 223 - And many other signs truly did Jesus in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book: But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name.
Page 200 - Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus, who though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited, but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death — even death on a cross.
Page 159 - For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.
Page 279 - Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.

À propos de l'auteur (2005)

Maxwell E. Johnson is professor of liturgy at the University of Notre Dame and a pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The author or editor of twenty-five books and of more than ninety articles and essays, he is also a past president of the North American Academy of Liturgy, serves as an editorial consultant for Worship, and is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Ecclesia Orans.

Informations bibliographiques