Progress, Volume 1

Couverture
University Association., 1895
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Page 306 - ... ever come, when you shall wish to enjoy the tranquillity of private life, may you have a son endowed with such qualities, that you can resign your sceptre to him, with as much satisfaction as I give up mine to you.
Page 226 - And the City of London shall have all its ancient liberties and free customs, as well by land as by water; furthermore we will and grant, that all other cities and boroughs, and towns and ports, shall have all their liberties and free customs.
Page 253 - And a villein shall be amerced after the same manner, saving to him his wainage, if he falls under our mercy ; and none of the aforesaid amerciaments shall be assessed but by the oath of honest men in the neighbourhood.
Page 306 - I had left you, by my death, this rich inheritance, to which I have made such large additions, some regard would have been justly due to my memory on that account ; but now, when I voluntarily resign to you what I might have still retained, I may well expect the warmest expressions of thanks on your part.
Page 252 - And for holding the general council of the kingdom concerning the assessment of aids, except in the three cases aforesaid, and for the assessing of scutages, we shall cause to be summoned the archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls, and greater barons of the realm, singly by our letters. And furthermore we shall cause to be summoned generally by our sheriffs and bailiffs, all others who hold of us in chief...
Page 136 - ... inquiring why the Roman empire was destroyed, we should rather be surprised that it had subsisted so long. The victorious legions, who in distant wars acquired the vices of strangers and mercenaries, first oppressed the freedom of the republic and afterwards violated the majesty of the purple. The emperors, anxious for their personal safety and the public peace, were reduced to the base expedient of corrupting the discipline which rendered them alike formidable to their sovereign and to the enemy;...
Page 305 - ... impression on the minds not only of his subjects but of his successor. With this view he called Philip out of England, where the peevish temper of his Queen, which increased with her despair of having issue, rendered him extremely unhappy ; and the jealousy of the English left him no hopes of obtaining the direction of their affairs. Having assembled the States of the Low Countries at Brussels, on the twenty-fifth of October, Charles seated...
Page 293 - ... had always been intrusted with the supreme direction of commercial police. It was their undoubted prerogative to regulate coin, weights, and measures, and to appoint fairs, markets, and ports. The line which bounded their authority over trade had, as usual, been but loosely drawn. They therefore, as usual, encroached on the province which rightfully belonged to the Legislature. The encroachment was, as usual, patiently borne, till it became serious. But at length the queen took upon herself to...
Page 226 - England be free, and that all men in our kingdom have and hold all the aforesaid liberties, rights, and concessions...
Page 226 - No freeman shall be taken or imprisoned, or disseised, or outlawed, or banished, or any ways destroyed, nor will we pass upon him, nor will we send upon him, unless by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land.

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