Dostoevsky’s Religion

Couverture
Stanford University Press, 2 mai 2005 - 224 pages
Any reader of Dostoevsky is immediately struck by the importance of religion within the world of his fiction. That said, it is very difficult to locate a coherent set of religious beliefs within Dostoevsky s works, and to argue that the writer embraced these beliefs. This book provides a trenchant reassessment of his religion by showing how Dostoevsky used his writings as the vehicle for an intense probing of the nature of Christianity, of the individual meaning of belief and doubt, and of the problems of ethical behavior that arise from these questions. The author argues that religion represented for Dostoevsky a welter of conflicting views and stances, from philosophical idealism to nationalist messianism. The strength of this study lies in its recognition of the absence of a single religious prescription in Dostoevsky's works, as well as in its success in tracing the background of the ideas animating Dostoevsky s religious probing.

À l'intérieur du livre

Table des matières

Historical Problems of Understanding I
1
The Context
26
Belief Is Contextual
64
Belief Is Expressed in Antinomies
87
Belief Is Ideal
114
Bathe the Earth with the Tears of Thy Joy
149
Conclusion
174
Notes
185
Index
199
Droits d'auteur

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 122 - Have ye not read, that he which made them at the beginning made them male and female, and said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain shall be one flesh? Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder.
Page 161 - For you are a people holy to the LORD your God. The LORD your God has chosen you out of all the peoples on the face of the earth to be his people, his treasured possession.
Page 155 - Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.
Page 161 - For we hold that a man is justified by faith apart from works of law. Or is God the God of Jews only? Is he not the God of Gentiles also? Yes, of Gentiles also, since God is one; and he will justify the circumcised on the ground of their faith, and the uncircumcised through their faith.
Page 116 - After the appearance of Christ as the ideal of man in the flesh, however, it became as clear as day that the highest, the ultimate development...
Page 8 - For to all those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away.
Page 156 - The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. Very truly, I tell you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains just a single grain; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. Those who love their life lose it, and those who hate their life in this world will keep it for eternal life.

À propos de l'auteur (2005)

Steven Cassedy is Professor of Slavic and Comparative Literature and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies at the University of California, San Diego.

Informations bibliographiques