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THE HEART OF THE PACIFIC.

313

A comparative view of the business of the Hawaiian Islands in the years 1849 and 1850, may be obtained from the following estimates and items, as found in the Hawaiian Government Paper of February 8th, 1851, published at Honolulu.

Gross receipts at the Custom House, Honolulu, 1849.

Increase in 1850..

Gross receipts at the Custom House, Lahaina, 1849

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$79,802.75

1850...

116,190.68

36,387.93

3,330.70

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1,872.45

97.87

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Domestic exports from Lahaina, (estimated,) 1849.

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112.90

15.03

89,743.74

1850..

139,007.79

49,264.05

14,000.00

241,314.84

227,314.84

729,739.44

1,053,058.70

323,319.26

622,637.37

1,006,528.98

Increase for 1850....

Value of Imports from different countries.

1849.

383,891.61

1850.

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The following are the principal items of domestic export for the years 1849 and 1850. The tables for 1849 do not give the exports from Lahaina in a separate list, as is the case for the year 1850. As few vessels loaded at that port, during 1849, direct for California, only 18 merchant vessels are reported as having arrived there; while in 1850, 127 arrived, a large proportion of which took in cargoes, or parts of cargoes, for California.

Sugar, lbs.....

Molasses, gallons...

Syrup, gallons..

Coffee, lbs.

Salt, barrels....

1849.

653,820

41,235

1850.

750,238

53,855

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Lime, barrels.

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These are the most important items of export, and it will be seen that the great increase over the previous year has been in what may properly be called the staples of the Islands—sugar, molasses, syrup, salt, Irish and sweet potatoes. Vegetables of less importance and fruits have greatly increased, and arrow-root has again taken its place among the exports from the Islands; and of these articles the production can be almost unlimited. Of syrup none was reported in 1849, and this is an article to which some of the plantations are now directing their whole attention, and which is more profitable than sugar.

Both the increase of the receipts at the Custom-house, and the extraordinary increase of exports, especially from Maui, are gratifying indications of advance in resources and wealth, and they ar、 calculated to add a new stimulant to the coffee-growers and sugar-planters of

THE HEART OF THE PACIFIC.

315

the Islands. During the first half of the year, the demand for coffee and sugar was so great, that had the quantity on hand been millions of pounds, it would have found a ready sale, at prices highly remunerative. And such, we apprehend, will continue to be the case in future years. At the present moment prices are greatly depressed, and the market at San Francisco is overstocked with these articles; but this very fact will withhold shipments from other countries, and the present stock will be reduced, and command a paying price. When that moment arrives, and it is sure to come, these Islands are the nearest point from whence the demand can be supplied, and, with the speed of stearn navigation, Hawaiian staples can be transported thither at the very moment they will pay best. Oregon is fast filling up, and California will, without a doubt, steadily increase in population for many years to come, though not so rapidly as during the past two years. Consumption of the staple products of the Islands will keep pace with the increase of population, and those articles which are peculiar to the tropics will always be in demand to the full extent of the ability to supply. The export of vegetables may not increase, or even come up to that of the year 1850; but fruits, coffee, sugar, syrup, and molasses, there is no doubt, will be required in a constantly increasing ratio, and will command a price that will well remunerate the producers at the Sandwich Islands.

The following comparative view will show how, in another way, the products of the Islands are in increasing demand.

Whole number of vessels that visited the Islands from 1848-'50:—

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The supplies furnished to these vessels amounted in 1849 to $81,340. in 1850 to 140,000.

Almost the whole of these supplies were raised from the soil, and consequently their value was so much added to the ability of the people to purchase the imports of the merchants, and to increase their own comfort.

The increased value of exports and supplies has, however, been more than equalled by the increase of imports. From California and the British colonies they have more than doubled; and the aggregate increase from all countries, for consumption, amounts to $383,891.61.

Increase of exports and supplies

Excess of imports

335,238.89.
58,652.72.

The total value of imports for consumption is... $1,006,528.98.
The total value of exports and supplies...

Excess of imports

536,522.63.

470,005.35.

Of this excess a considerable amount has been in sugar-mills, and agricultural implements for the cultivation of the soil, admitted duty free by government. Another portion was introduced by consuls and missions, for consumption and not for sale. How has the balance (say $400,000) been paid for? In part by the direct introduction of capital invested in plantations, &c.; in part by profits derived from shipments abroad on island account; and in a great degree by money put in circulation by strangers, returned Hawaiians, captains, officers, and crews of ships, which do not come into the calculation of " supplies." There may be a small debt against the Islands on account of imports, but it probably does not exceed the amount of goods still remaining unsold in the hands of importers.

These statistics show progress, and awaken the hope that the Hawaiian Islands have entered upon a course of increasing prosperity, depending almost wholly upon the development of their agricultural resources. To this point the most earnest attention should be given by Government and the people of the Islands. The great desideratum of a ready market now exists at their own doors; and if the demand is not promptly met, it will not be because Providence has not furnished all the means and appliances for so important an object.

From the Reports of Keoni Ana, Minister of the Interior, and of Robert Crichton Wyllie, Minister of Foreign Relations, we learn that the number of foreigners who have taken the oath of allegiance during the year 1850 is 151, citizens of the following countries :—

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The amount of goods sold at auction in the Hawaiian Kingdom during the same year was $1,060,760.38.

The amount received for public licenses is $24,145.

In real estate, the number of royal patents granted during the year is 314.

To aliens......

25.

To subjects...............

319.

By the annexed tables can be seen the number of acres sold on each island, and the gross amount of their price.

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The avails to the Treasury of the Interior Department, during the year 1850, have been $84,350.65.

We add to the foregoing exhibition of the commerce and trade of the Sandwich Islands, a tabular view also of educational and religious progress at the Heart of the Pacific.

During the year ending May 1, 1850, 851 members were received on examination into 17 of the churches at these Islands. The number admitted on examination to the churches at Kaanapali, Waiane, and Waimea, and on Molokai, is not reported. The largest number added to any one church is 369, to the first church in Honolulu. This church received, besides, 106 members from other churches.

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19 of the churches report a loss by death of 1277 members; while 18 of these churches report the baptism of only 295 children. In connection with 17 of them, there were 1354 marriages.

The following list of contributions to purposes of benevolence shows the amount given by these churches, and the objects to which it was appropriated. The list is not complete, no report having been received from five of the churches.

KAUAI.- Waioli,.. Monthly concert, for native preacher at Koloa $15.00
Monthly concert, for repairs of church.
For shingling of church.

ОAHU.-Kaneohe, . Objects not stated...

Waialua, For French Protestant Mission.

For meeting-houses

Honolulu, 2d ch., Monthly concert..

46.50

173.50

500.00

30.86

293.00

108.69

320.00

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For support of pastor

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