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the chief agricultural products of this region, although almost any thing may be made to grow, the soil being a comparatively recent decomposition of lava, exceedingly productive all the way up from the sea-side to the top of the mountain, the ascent of which is here so gradual and smoothly carpeted with green, that you can ride on horseback quite up to the clouds.

Directly opposite the mission premises, which are only forty or fifty rods from the sea, there rises a high volcanic bluff four hundred and fifty feet, being the easternmost point of Maui, called Kauwiki. In a cave at its base, which I have visited, the now worldknown Queen Kaahumanu, whose portrait faces the title of this volume, first saw the light, in a time of

war.

In one of his preaching tours through this region, before there was a resident missionary, Mr. Armstrong called at this spot, and, from his acquaintance with the facts of history, he very naturally penned his meditations in these words :-"An individual is born at Hana, the very end of the earth, (for the house stood on the very extremity of the island, and not two rods from the water's edge,) of high, but heathen parents; brought up from childhood in perfect familiarity with all that is corrupting, degrading, hardening, and darkening; con

a foot deep with wet, half-rotten straw, extending this mulching as the branches grew.

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Imagine my delight at finding the gooseberries on the bushes so mulched ripening off finely, the fruit twice as large as I have ever seen it before, and quite fair and free from mildew."

THE TWO EXTREMES OF HEATHENISM.

149

sequently, became one of the worst of human kindhaughty, filthy, lewd, tyrannical, cruel, wrathful, murderous, and almost every thing else that is bad. So she lived for perhaps fifty years; and then, while sitting Queen of this nation, feared and flattered by all, the grace of God reached her heart, and she put off the old man, with his deeds. She reigned a few years as a Christian, constraining the very enemies of truth to admire her integrity, her regard for the poor, and her wisdom as a ruler, and died in 1832, praising God and the Lamb."

Some of her last words audible were, as translated, thus :-"I will go to Jesus, and shall be comforted.

Lo, here am I, O Jesus:

Grant me thy gracious smile!"

Well may we say, Wonderful, wonderful, to such an epitome of history as hers was from her cave to her grave! In this remarkable Hawaiian Queen, and the no less remarkable Hawaiian Preacher, we have exemplified at once the moral Heart of the Pacific, as it was and as it is. Two things here are almost equally strange in the Kingdom of Nature and the Kingdom of Grace. One is, that the volcano of depravity should ever have become extinct so entirely, and at about the same time, in those two extreme ends of heathenism, the despot Kaahumanu, and the slave Bartimeus! The other is, how, why, or when the belching volcano, at the foot of which Kaahumanu was born, ceased to burn.

Eruptions of scoria, slag, cinders, and pumice, have evidently issued from both its sides, and flowed over in strata that are plainly marked where they are broken off, on the side next the sea. You descend into one of its craters by a winding way made by earthquake and art in its readily yielding, disintegrated sides; and there at the bottom is a fine covert basin of water for bathing, with a beach of volcanic sand, defended from the outrageous surf by a barrier of lava-rock, against which the sea is ever thundering, and tossing over its giant arms and briny spray.

The top of the cone, in olden time a fort, is now the dormitory of a large flock of sheep and goats, which you may see clambering up its sides every evening, and scampering down in the morning. Sometimes they get tumbled over the precipice into the crater, and are pau loa i ka make, as the natives say, or quite used up; that is, taught in the same way that Cowper says he taught the viper in his Colubriad:

With outstretched hoe I slew him at the door,
And taught him never to come there no more.

In clear weather, a fine view is obtained from Hana to the southeast, across the channel, of the broad-backed Island of Hawaii, distant about thirty miles. Its three great pyramids, or more properly domes, of Mauna Kea on the east, Mauna Loa on the south, and Mauna Hualalai on the west, loom up magnificently in the rising or setting sun.

We were intending to have gone across by canoe,

PROJECTED ROUTE THROUGH HALE-A-KA-LA. 151

to see again the mission family at Kohala, and thence over to Waimea by land, to embark in a schooner from Kawaihae either for Lahaina or Oahu. But the sea is not calm enough for natives to venture, and may not be for several weeks. We purpose, therefore, to return to Wailuku by a route yet unexplored by white men, through the colossal crater of Hale-a-ka-la, or the House of the Sun. The Palace of the Sun, therefore, we may next enter, in order to learn what rarities in furniture and equipage are to be found there,

Right against the eastern gate,

Where the great sun begins his state;
Robed in flames, and amber bright,
The clouds in thousand liveries dight."

CHAPTER VII.

ADVENTURE, ESCAPE, AND ARRIVAL AT MOLOKAI.

HE that in venturous barks hath been

A wanderer on the deep,

Can tell of many an awful scene,

Where storms forever sweep.

O God! thy name they well may praise
Who to the deep go down,

And trace the wonders of thy ways,

Where rocks and billows frown!

MRS. HEMANS.

We embark in the double canoe-Sudden catastrophe-Men swept overboard-A special providence-How we are saved-A traveller's hymn-Emotions of gratitude and impulses of obedience-Behavior of the natives-Effect of familiarity with danger-Remark of Butler-The psalm of life-The fatal sequel of another disaster-Conflict with the sharks-They win the day-The raft rises-Few escape-We gain the reef-Lagoons for fish-How to make abstract numbers concrete-Reefs described-Spiritual analogies and lessons derived-Rules for the navigator-The Divine Pilot-Ocean of futurity-Site of the Molokai Mission-Head-quarters of Æolus-A missionary's grapery-The two vineyards, natural and moral--Division of labor-Church and school-Industrial enterprise-The maids of Molokai--Native costume versus the foreign--Court fashion and rules of dress-The queen's way of conformity--Criticism on the fashionable habiliments of the sex--Honest remonstrance and satire by Dana.

A CHANGE in my route little expected, finds me at another island, seventy miles by canoe from Hana, instead of ranging through the crater of Kale-a-ka-la. To Him, whose unseen mighty arm defends and upholds us, when we can take no care of ourselves, be all the praise that our grave has not been made upon the coral bottom of the deep, between Molokai and Mani.

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