The Meditative Path: A Gentle Way to Awareness, Concentration, and Serenity

Couverture
Quest Books, 1 juin 2001 - 287 pages
1 Commentaire
Les avis ne sont pas validés, mais Google recherche et supprime les faux contenus lorsqu'ils sont identifiés
Once, the Mula Nasruden was searching the ground under a street lamp. "Can I help?" asked a friend. "I lost my key in the house," said Nasruden. "But then why look out here?" "Because the light is better in the street," came the reply. Nasruden is a great fool in Middle Eastern folklore. Only by turning on the light inside his house -- his inner psyche --will he find the key. John Cianciosi shows us how to do just that. Directly from the heart, this practical, nonreligious book guides the reader of any faith to reduce stress, increase health, and achieve inner peace. It clearly explains the meditative process and offers very simple exercises to balance theory and practice. Each chapter includes Q&A sections based on the average reader's experience and crafted from the author's twenty-four years of teaching, first as a Buddhist monk and now in lay life. Of all primers on meditation, this one excels in showing how to slow down life in the fast lane.
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Table des matières

RELAXING THE BODY
10
SITTING MEDITATION
29
QUESTION TIME
52
DEALING WITH THE HINDRANCES
79
QUESTION TIME
100
WALKING MEDITATION
117
MEDITATION IN ACTION
123
QUESTION TIME
144
STANDING LIKE A MOUNTAIN
179
CHANGING ANGER
185
LOVING KINDNESS MEDITATION
210
SELFAWARENESS
217
Who Am I?
239
FOLLOWING THE PATH
249
A DAY FOR MEDITATION
259
WORKS CITED 267

EXPLORING THE Six FIELDS
155
WORKING WITH PAIN
163

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (2001)

For over two decades, Australian John Cianciosi (known in Thailand as Venerable Ajahn Jagaro) had been a fully ordained Buddhist monk in the Thai Theravada tradition, and abbot of the International Forest Monastery in northeast Thailand. Then he accepted an invitation from the Buddhist Society of Western Australia to establish a Forest Monastery to the south of Perth. He worked there tirelessly as abbot, meditation teacher, counselor and manager for the growing Buddhist community, and as with the monastery in Thailand, it flourished mightily under his direction. During his time there, he gained a national reputation for his oratory; until he left the monkhood in 1995, he appeared frequently on national television. His ability to express the Buddhist teachings in a clear and direct modern idiom are universally praised.

Informations bibliographiques